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Sociolects in English - UniLang

Sociolects in English

Moderators: dEhiN, JackFrost

Lisi
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Sociolects in English

Postby Lisi » 2015-01-21, 16:21

Hello everybody!

As an english learner I only know the "standard" language but don't know much about sociolects such as "miners language", "sufers language" and so on.

Could you teach me some cool words from a sociolect? Thanks! :)

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linguoboy
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Re: Sociolects in English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-01-21, 17:40

I'm only familiar with boring sociolects, those of teachers and librarians.

For contemporary youth sociolects, Urban Dictionary is a fantastic source.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Ciarán12
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Re: Sociolects in English

Postby Ciarán12 » 2015-01-21, 19:25

Of course, there are also different sociolects within dialects, so you'd have to pick which dialect you are looking for too ;)
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

Lisi
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Re: Sociolects in English

Postby Lisi » 2015-01-21, 19:43

Thanks for your answers.

Okay... what would be interesting? Welsh miner and Hawaian surfer guy (or any other sociolect if none of you speaks one of these).

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Ciarán12
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Re: Sociolects in English

Postby Ciarán12 » 2015-01-21, 19:54

Lisi wrote:Thanks for your answers.

Okay... what would be interesting? Welsh miner and Hawaian surfer guy (or any other sociolect if none of you speaks one of these).


:lol:

I would be very surprised if there were any Welsh miners here. Hawaian Surfers are somehow more likely, but I still don't know of any here.

I can give you working class and "posh" Dublin, that's about it.
Beidh Gaeilge líofa chruinn bhlasta agam nó go bhfaighe mé bás san iarracht!

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linguoboy
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Re: Sociolects in English

Postby linguoboy » 2015-01-21, 20:16

Lisi wrote:Okay... what would be interesting? Welsh miner and Hawaian surfer guy (or any other sociolect if none of you speaks one of these).
Here's a brief guide to the lexicon of surfing in American English: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_surfing.

There was a fun television spot several years ago which had businessmen negotiating a deal entirely in surf jargon. I'll see if I can't track it down.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

languagelearner33
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Re: Sociolects in English

Postby languagelearner33 » 2015-01-24, 19:09

I agree with that post a few up. urbandictionary.com is a GREAT place to pick up slang terms and such. As someone who's fairly young, I can tell you that it's not every day that I hear someone using "surfer" sociolect/jargon/whatever. I guess it is really dependent on what kind of situation you would like to use your sociolect in. If you're going to a nice dinner with friends or family the sociolect you use is going to differ from what you would use if you were going to a party or to the bars.
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