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Differences between nordic languages - amusing! - Page 2 - UniLang

Differences between nordic languages - amusing!

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einhar
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Postby einhar » 2006-10-30, 21:37

In Icelandic we have sunka, which means fall down, a sinking movement. It's more like the spelled sinkwan. I sank into the chair means. Ég sunkaðist ofan í stólinn or Ég sökk ofan í stólinn. But sökkva, synkva and sinkwan may have sounded similiar. Who knows?

Amikeco, does the German ü corresponds to the Danish y?

Could Gunther correspond to the Icelandic Gunnþór (Battle Thor)?
Last edited by einhar on 2006-10-30, 22:03, edited 1 time in total.

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Nukalurk
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Postby Nukalurk » 2006-10-30, 22:02

"ü" is like [y], and [ʏ] (I think). So if the Danish "y" is like that, then yes.

Gunther played an important role in the Nibelungensage, which is based on old tales but the story itself is distorted.

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einhar
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Postby einhar » 2006-10-30, 22:09

Amikeco wrote:"ü" is like [y], and [ʏ] (I think). So if the Danish "y" is like that, then yes.

Gunther played an important role in the Nibelungensage, which is based on old tales but the story itself is distorted.

Gunther is a lot like GunþaharijaR from Proto Norse, which Hunef mentioned earlier.

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Hunef
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Postby Hunef » 2006-10-31, 19:52

einhar wrote:In Icelandic we have sunka, which means fall down, a sinking movement. It's more like the spelled sinkwan. I sank into the chair means. Ég sunkaðist ofan í stólinn or Ég sökk ofan í stólinn. But sökkva, synkva and sinkwan may have sounded similiar. Who knows?

There's a Swedish adjective sunkig 'trashy' which may come from the Swedish verb sunka, which is another (but hardly ever used) spelling of sjunka.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
Carl Sagan

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Hunef
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Postby Hunef » 2006-10-31, 19:57

einhar wrote:
Amikeco wrote:"ü" is like [y], and [ʏ] (I think). So if the Danish "y" is like that, then yes.

Gunther played an important role in the Nibelungensage, which is based on old tales but the story itself is distorted.

Gunther is a lot like GunþaharijaR from Proto Norse, which Hunef mentioned earlier.

Yes, Proto-Norse became nn in Old Norse, but th in English ("tooth" < tanþu) and probably nt i some German words. (Though 'Zahn' = "tooth".) More consistently, Proto-Norse is ll in Old Norse but ld in contemporary Western Germanic. E.g. gulþ- 'gold', which is gull in Old Norse.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
Carl Sagan

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linguoboy
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Re:

Postby linguoboy » 2011-10-19, 16:24

Hunef wrote:Yes, Proto-Norse became nn in Old Norse, but th in English ("tooth" < tanþu) and probably nt i some German words. (Though 'Zahn' = "tooth".) More consistently, Proto-Norse is ll in Old Norse but ld in contemporary Western Germanic. E.g. gulþ- 'gold', which is gull in Old Norse.

The usual outcome of PGmc *þ in High German is /d/, e.g. *munþs > Mund, *anþeraz > ander. Zant (gen. zandes) is found in MHG alongside zan. I'm not sure what accounts for the prevalence of the latter form, but it parallels the development in Low Saxon (i.e. mod. NLS Tähn [pl. idem.]).
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons


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