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Differences between nordic languages - amusing! - UniLang

Differences between nordic languages - amusing!

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Differences between nordic languages - amusing!

Postby North » 2006-08-30, 13:23

Earlier this summer, I was in a great company with faroese, icelandic and danish people - it was the icelandic writer Einar Már Guðmundsson, his son, my boyfriend and his father (also a writer) and other persons together, talking about literature and other things.

We came to talk about the differences between the languages - and we talked about the word "Klæðir".

In danish, "klæder" is clothings, but it is a little old word, and we usually say "tøj".

In faroese "klæðir" is the same as "tøj" or "clothings".

... but Einars son laughed, and said that in Icelandic "klæðir" would be something that vikings wear :D

How can this be, and what is the Icelandic word for "tøj" or "clothing", then? I just wondered.

We also talked about the danish word "rart" (nice), that in Norweigan will be "strange".

So if a dane say to a person from Norway "det var rart at møde dig" (nice to meet you), it will in norweigan mean "strange to meet you" :oops:

Do you know of other differences/mistakes between the nordic languages? I think that I will try to make a collection of these words/phrases :wink: I find it very amusing 8)

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Re: Differences between nordic languages - amusing!

Postby Hunef » 2006-08-30, 19:50

North wrote:Earlier this summer, I was in a great company with faroese, icelandic and danish people - it was the icelandic writer Einar Már Guðmundsson, his son, my boyfriend and his father (also a writer) and other persons together, talking about literature and other things.

We came to talk about the differences between the languages - and we talked about the word "Klæðir".

In danish, "klæder" is clothings, but it is a little old word, and we usually say "tøj".

In faroese "klæðir" is the same as "tøj" or "clothings".

... but Einars son laughed, and said that in Icelandic "klæðir" would be something that vikings wear :D

How can this be, and what is the Icelandic word for "tøj" or "clothing", then? I just wondered.

We also talked about the danish word "rart" (nice), that in Norweigan will be "strange".

So if a dane say to a person from Norway "det var rart at møde dig" (nice to meet you), it will in norweigan mean "strange to meet you" :oops:

Do you know of other differences/mistakes between the nordic languages? I think that I will try to make a collection of these words/phrases :wink: I find it very amusing 8)

In Swedish, 'kläder' simply means "clothings", and is the most common word for it and perfectly valid in normal speech. Not an archaic word like in Danish or Icelandic.
In Swedish, 'rar' means "sweet". So, if a dane says "det var rart at møde dig", I would interpret that as if she (or he!!! :shock:) were hitting on me.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
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Postby Gormur » 2006-08-30, 19:58

My dialect uses klede for clothes.
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Postby Hunef » 2006-08-30, 20:23

Gormur wrote:My dialect uses klede for clothes.

My dialect uses "kle`a" - or in older speech "kle`e". I write it kléð' (following the older pronunciation) in my orthography for Jamtlandic.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
Carl Sagan

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Postby óðinn » 2006-08-31, 9:40

Gormur wrote:My dialect uses klede for clothes.


Mine too! :D

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Postby leonarda » 2006-10-20, 16:23

Hi
The word kát has developed differently in the different languages. In Icelandic kátur means happy, or glad (I hope). In Norwegian kåt normally means horny. (In some old litterature it is used in the old sense though, but normally as I said, it means horny)

Also the word pirrandi in Icelandic means annoying. In Norwegian in many cases pirrende would be used about something sexy. It has many meanings though, but I think most of them would be positive (after a very brief and superficial examining of my own associations to this word).

Finally I find it confusing with these words that I tend to mix up: Icelandic herbergi= Norwegian rom. Icelandic rúm= Norwegian seng. Icelandic sæng= Norw dyne Icelandic dýna= Norw madrass. See how this is confusing???? Help!!

The list of "false friends" between the Nordic languages is endless I think. If people keep sending in it will be a looooong list.

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Postby Aleco » 2006-10-20, 17:00

Haha :lol:

But pirrende is most used as "annoying" here :?
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Postby Aleco » 2006-10-20, 17:02

Hunef wrote:
Gormur wrote:My dialect uses klede for clothes.

My dialect uses "kle`a" - or in older speech "kle`e". I write it kléð' (following the older pronunciation) in my orthography for Jamtlandic.


kle'a is what we say on my dialect for "The clothes" :roll:

But we say "klær" til clothes ;) Tøy isn't used her emuch :wink:
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Postby Mulder-21 » 2006-10-20, 17:26

Beside the same ones that leonarda mentioned, I can mention a funny false friend.

In Faroese the word 'koppur' means 'cup'. In Icelandic however, it means 'potty' or the night-potty people keep/kept under their beds.

The Icelandic word for 'cup' is 'bolli', in Faroese 'bolli' can means two things: ll pronunced as [l:] means 'bun' (pastry), and ll pronunced as [dl] means a plastic bowl where you mix butter, sugar etc. to make dough for baking.

In Faroese, 'herberg' means 'hostel' but Herbergið is a house in Tórshavn for homeless people to spend the night.

As for 'rar' the closest word in Faroese is 'rárur', which means 'rare'.

Also, note that the -r in 'klæði' really isn't necessary, and is probably a result of analogy. Both forms are allowed though. Personally, I never but an -r to the word in plural, since context decides if the word is in plural or singular. (A side note, since the -i is very weak, many people make the plural form *'kløð', which is very, very wrong!) Faroese also has the word 'toy' (which can be pronunced both as [tOi] and [t9i]), however, it's a loanword from Danish AFAICT, since the words most similar to it, have nothing to do with clothes.

The Faroese word for 'bed' is 'song'. However, 'songur' means 'song'.

Faroese has the verb 'at pirra', however, it has nothing to do with neither 'annoying' nor sexually related things. Instead, 'at pirra' is used for dogs and cats with gonorrhea! (rightly spelled)

Kátur means 'happy' or 'joyous', just as in Icelandic.
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Postby Aleco » 2006-10-20, 19:58

Herberg do mean something like "hotel" in Norwegian too :wink:
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Postby Hunef » 2006-10-20, 20:14

The Swedish word 'kåt' means horny, while Jamtlandic 'kát' has the old meaning of being happy in general.

The Swedish word 'pirrande' has no special meaning except the one coming directly from the corresponding verb 'pirra', which means 'tingle'.

The Swedish word 'härbärge' means 'shelter', mainly for homeless people to spend in over the night.

Mulder-21 wrote:Faroese has the verb 'at pirra', however, it has nothing to do with neither 'annoying' nor sexually related things. Instead, 'at pirra' is used for dogs and cats with gonorrhea! (rightly spelled)

I guess the Faroese dogs and cats don't bother to use condoms. I knew that Faroe islands are somewhat moral conservative (i.e. conseravtive christian values are still dominant in everyday life), but this info takes the prize... :roll:
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
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Postby leonarda » 2006-10-23, 9:47

Comment to the Faroese answer about bollur: Yes, the bollur/koppur fooled me once, I asked a man at work if he wanted a "kaffikoppur" (I of course took the Norwegian word kaffikopp and translatad it directly...). He did not want it :)

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Postby einhar » 2006-10-23, 20:03

Herbergi is a room in Icelandic and earlier it meant a gesthouse, herberg is a hotel in Norwegian and härbärge means a shelter in Swedish.
In all these languages it means a place to stay in.
Berg means a cliff or a rock in icelandic and her means a group of people.
I conclude that herberg initially was a cave with a group of people. :idea: The first settlers in Scandinavia may have lived in caves (herberg).

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Postby Gormur » 2006-10-30, 18:37

Hær means army in Norwegian - in my dialect it sounds virtually the same as Icelandic her. I would translate Norwegian berg as mountain (I don't think it has any other meanings, but I could be wrong) and a herberge is a hostel; it can also refer to a homeless shelter (gjestgiversted), not a hotel - that would be hotell. :roll: Herberg is Danish, and I guess it means the same thing, but I'm not sure.
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Postby Hunef » 2006-10-30, 20:16

einhar wrote:Herbergi is a room in Icelandic and earlier it meant a gesthouse, herberg is a hotel in Norwegian and härbärge means a shelter in Swedish.
In all these languages it means a place to stay in.
Berg means a cliff or a rock in icelandic and her means a group of people.
I conclude that herberg initially was a cave with a group of people. :idea: The first settlers in Scandinavia may have lived in caves (herberg).

The first sttlers in Scandinavia surely didn't speak "Scandinavian" (i.e., Scandinavian Proto-Germanic), so your remark is not so relevant, I think. When people started to speak "Scandinavian" (3000 years ago?), scandinavians probably lived in some kind of man-made buildings already. Even the earliest scandinavians - i.e., the sami people - for sure lived in man-made constructions, probably tents like they still do during herding season in the summer.

Einhar, I am not sure if you've ever visited the southernmost part of Scandinavia (through which the earliest "Scandinavian" speaking people much have passed), there aren't many caves to live in there.

The correct etymology for the Old Norse word herbergi is that her- means 'army', but that -bergi is a noun form of the verb bjarga 'put in safe place'. So, herbergi literally means 'a safe place to put an army'. :wink:
(NB: The noun borg 'castle' is a much older noun form related to bjarga.)

In the Swedish dialects, härbärge means a small building - attached or close to the main building on a farm - where one stored things or let guests live. Usually spelled härbre (pron. /häbbre/) in this meaning when used in Standard Swedish. So,
    härbärge /härbärje/ = shelter,
    härbre /häbbre/ = small (storage or guest-)house
i.e., the dialectal meaning is the same as in old Icelandic.
Einhar, do you have any evidence of the development herbergi > herbri > hebbri in Icelandic as well? Like in many Swedish dialects, you have the similar development *féhús > *feus > fjós. (Though Jamtlandic is in fact on the older stage *feus, spelled fous due to a middle step *føus. A star, *, denotes assumed forms not found in writing.)
Last edited by Hunef on 2006-10-30, 20:36, edited 5 times in total.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
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Postby einhar » 2006-10-30, 20:21

Gormur wrote:Hær means army in Norwegian - in my dialect it sounds virtually the same as Icelandic her. I would translate Norwegian berg as mountain (I don't think it has any other meanings, but I could be wrong) and a herberge is a hostel; it can also refer to a homeless shelter (gjestgiversted), not a hotel - that would be hotell. :roll: Herberg is Danish, and I guess it means the same thing, but I'm not sure.


Her also means an army in Icelandic. But if we dig a little deeper in this and ask ourselves what is an army or what was an army, fx thousands years ago. An army was nothing but a group of people ready to fight against enemies.
If her means and meant a group of people in Icelandic it surely meant the same in Old Norse, but that meaning may have changed when centuries went by.

Ar is an obsolete word in Icelandic, but it remains in personal names, like Einar, Gunnar etc. This ar means a soldier. I wonder if it is related to the English word army!

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Postby Hunef » 2006-10-30, 20:41

einhar wrote:
Gormur wrote:Hær means army in Norwegian - in my dialect it sounds virtually the same as Icelandic her. I would translate Norwegian berg as mountain (I don't think it has any other meanings, but I could be wrong) and a herberge is a hostel; it can also refer to a homeless shelter (gjestgiversted), not a hotel - that would be hotell. :roll: Herberg is Danish, and I guess it means the same thing, but I'm not sure.


Her also means an army in Icelandic. But if we dig a little deeper in this and ask ourselves what is an army or what was an army, fx thousands years ago. An army was nothing but a group of people ready to fight against enemies.
If her means and meant a group of people in Icelandic it surely meant the same in Old Norse, but that meaning may have changed when centuries went by.

Ar is an obsolete word in Icelandic, but it remains in personal names, like Einar, Gunnar etc. This ar means a soldier. I wonder if it is related to the English word army!

The ar part comes from Proto-Norse *harijaR 'warrior'. E.g. Old Norse Gunnar comes from Proto-Norse *GunþaharijaR, where Gunþa- must be related to English 'gun', i.e. a kind of weapon.
In German, this name has become "Günther". Note the i-umlaut; there should be an a-umlaut and i-umlaut in the Old NOrse word - "Gonnerr" (Gunþa- > Gonn-, -harijaR > -(h)err) but these are not existent by some reason.
But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.
Carl Sagan

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Postby einhar » 2006-10-30, 20:47

Hunef wrote:
einhar wrote:
Gormur wrote:Hær means army in Norwegian - in my dialect it sounds virtually the same as Icelandic her. I would translate Norwegian berg as mountain (I don't think it has any other meanings, but I could be wrong) and a herberge is a hostel; it can also refer to a homeless shelter (gjestgiversted), not a hotel - that would be hotell. :roll: Herberg is Danish, and I guess it means the same thing, but I'm not sure.


Her also means an army in Icelandic. But if we dig a little deeper in this and ask ourselves what is an army or what was an army, fx thousands years ago. An army was nothing but a group of people ready to fight against enemies.
If her means and meant a group of people in Icelandic it surely meant the same in Old Norse, but that meaning may have changed when centuries went by.

Ar is an obsolete word in Icelandic, but it remains in personal names, like Einar, Gunnar etc. This ar means a soldier. I wonder if it is related to the English word army!

The ar part comes from Proto-Norse *harijaR 'warrior'. E.g. Old Norse Gunnar comes from Proto-Norse *GunþaharijaR, where Gunþa- must be related to English 'gun', i.e. a kind of weapon.


Gunn in Old Icelandic (Icelanders always call ON OI) is orrusta wich means a battle.

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Hunef
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Postby Hunef » 2006-10-30, 20:55

einhar wrote:
Hunef wrote:
einhar wrote:
Gormur wrote:Hær means army in Norwegian - in my dialect it sounds virtually the same as Icelandic her. I would translate Norwegian berg as mountain (I don't think it has any other meanings, but I could be wrong) and a herberge is a hostel; it can also refer to a homeless shelter (gjestgiversted), not a hotel - that would be hotell. :roll: Herberg is Danish, and I guess it means the same thing, but I'm not sure.


Her also means an army in Icelandic. But if we dig a little deeper in this and ask ourselves what is an army or what was an army, fx thousands years ago. An army was nothing but a group of people ready to fight against enemies.
If her means and meant a group of people in Icelandic it surely meant the same in Old Norse, but that meaning may have changed when centuries went by.

Ar is an obsolete word in Icelandic, but it remains in personal names, like Einar, Gunnar etc. This ar means a soldier. I wonder if it is related to the English word army!

The ar part comes from Proto-Norse *harijaR 'warrior'. E.g. Old Norse Gunnar comes from Proto-Norse *GunþaharijaR, where Gunþa- must be related to English 'gun', i.e. a kind of weapon.


Gunn in Old Icelandic (Icelanders always call ON OI) is orrusta wich means a battle.

OK. I could've looked it up, but you gave me the correct meaning of the word!
So, the Proto-Norse word was *gunþuR? (Assuming that Old Icelandic gunn is a strong masculine.) Or could it have been *gunþaR with a lack of a-umlaut to Old Icelandic "gonn".

NB: Old Icelandic was just a tiny and rather insignificant dialect of Old Norse. Since you're an icelander (and this is the Icelandic forum), I use the Old Icelandic forms when speaking about Old Norse. (The good thing with Old Icelandic is that one can uniquely reproduce all other Old Norse dialect forms. That's why Old Icelandic often is considered synonyme to Old Norse. No other variety of Old Norse can reproduce the forms of every other Old Norse dialect, so Old Icelandic covers all the information of the complete Old Norse language. The reason is of course that Old Icelandic had preserved all umlauts etc. When I think about it, Old Icelandic can't reproduce nasal assmilations, like svampaR > svappr 'mushroom', but except from this it's the best candidate for representing all of Old Norse. One can of course mínvent an idealized Old Norse by using the western umlauts and eastern nasal dissimilations. This would give Old Norse at synkva 'to sink', cf. Old Icelandic at søkkva and Old Swedish at sjunka. Note that Proto-Norse had *sinkwan.
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Nukalurk
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Postby Nukalurk » 2006-10-30, 21:08

Hunef wrote:In German, this name has become "Günther".


We also have "Gunther" as name. ;)


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